Dr. WANG, Xiaolin,  Dr. Eng.,  Professor
  Applied Chemistry Division,
 

Department of Chemical Engineering,

  Tsinghua University,   Beijing, China 100084
  Tel: 8610 62772130/62782654 Fax: 8610 62785475/62770304
  Email: xl-wang@tsinghua.edu.cn
Laboratory Homepage

 

Brief Introduction

Research Area 

 

Publications

 

Chinese Version


Brief Introduction

Education: 1979-1986 B. Eng. & M. Eng. in chemical engineering from The University of Chemical Technology; 1992-1995 Dr. Eng. from The University of Tokyo.

Occupation: 1986-1991 lecturer at The University of Chemical Technology; 1995-1997 assistant professor at The University of Tokyo; 1997-2000 associate professor then professor at The University of Chemical Technology; 2000- professor at Tsinghua University. Referee (1997-)ofJournal of Membrane Scienceand editorial committee (2000-) of Membrane Science and Technology. Research fields: membrane separation science and electro-chemical engineering.

 

Research Area:      Membrane Separation Science     Electro-Chemical Engineering

Membrane Separation Science

(1) Membrane transport mechanism

There are many membrane separation processes such as Reverse Osmosis (RO), Nanofiltration (NF), Ultrafiltration (UF), Microfiltration (MF), Electro-Dialysis (ED), Pervaporation (PV), Gas Separation (GS) and so on. Many models and theories, such as non-equilibrium thermodynamics model, statistical mechanics, hydrodynamics, interface science and solution theory, molecular dynamics simulation, are applied to characterize these transport phenomena, to understand these separation mechanism, and to establish quantitative relation between membrane separation performance and the micro-structure and surface properties of the membranes. It is very importance for development of new membrane preparation techniques and application of membrane technology to new separation purposes.

(2) Membrane process integration

Membrane process integration such as ①optimization of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration for highly concentration systems,②integration of nanofiltration, ultrafiltration and microfiltration for compositive separation systems, ③coupling of membrane separation and bio-chemical reaction for microbial zymolytic processes are being designed and carried out to promote membrane technology to the highly concentration of fruity juice, the separation and purification of bio-chemical products such as amino acids, peptides, proteins and oligosaccharides and the recovery of valuable matters from waste effluences.

(3) Preparation of new-type separation membranes

In order to satisfy the development of new separation systems and processes, new-type separation membranes are prepared by selecting new functional materials, adjusting the microporous structure, and modifying surface or interface properties. Now we are trying to prepare gated membrane sensitive to temperature or the pH value of solution by using plasma graft pretreatment and pore-filling polymerization method, and new-type proton conducting membrane with high temperature-resistant and inhibiting to methanol permeation.  

Electro-Chemical Engineering

(1) Sodium chloride electrolysis by ion-exchange membrane method with oxygen cathode

  Sodium chloride electrolysis is an energy consumptive process. Oxygen diffusion-reduction cathode have been paid much attention to replace conventional hydrogen evolution cathodes in chlorine-alkali ion-exchange membrane cells since the realization of large voltage saving (about 1.0 V) from hydrogen evolution reaction to oxygen reduction reaction. It is estimated that the new process with oxygen diffusion-reduction cathode will save electric power of about 700 kW·hr in the production of 100% solid sodium hydroxide of 1 ton. In order to promote this technology, lab-scale of sodium chloride electrolysis system with oxygen diffusion-reduction cathode will be designed and investigated for the scale-up; and oxygen diffusion-reduction cathode will be developed at the same time.

(2) Direct methanol fuel cell

Coordinate evolution of the energy development, energy utilization and environment protection should be the base for economic growth in 21st century. Fuel cells constitute an attractive power-generation technology that converts chemical energy directly and with high efficiency into electricity while causing little pollution. The direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are comparable to indirect fuel cells in view of their lower weight and volume. However, there are a number of further serious process engineering problems such as methanol crossover through the cell and sluggish electro-catalytic reaction methanol. In order to improve the performance of the DMFC, it is necessary to eliminate or, at least, to reduce the loss of methanol across the cell. The membrane technology is one of the alternatives for trying to solve this problem.

 

 Publications

[1]     Jian Huang, X-L Wang, Xiu-Zhen Chen, Xue-Hai Yu. Plasma-induced graft polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide into porous polyethylene membranes, to be accepted by Polymer Preprints. (2001) 42.

[2]     Y-H Xu, X-L Wang, The new research direction of alkaline secondary battery: Ni-C rechargeable battery using carbon nanotubes as negative electrode, to be accepted by J. Mater. Chem. Phys. (2001)

[3]     X-L Wang, Ai-Ling Ying, Wei-Ning Wang. Nanofiltration of of L-Phenylalanine and L-Aspartic acid Aqueous Solution, J. Membrane Sci., 196, (2002) 59-67.

[4]    X-L Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao, S. Kimura, Model Calculation of Streaming Potential of Charged Porous Membranes, Third Joint China/USA Chemical Engineering Conference, Beijing, China (2000).

[5]    X-L Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao, S. Kimura, Model Calculation of Streaming Potential of Charged Porous Membranes, Third Joint China/USA Chemical Engineering Conference, Beijing, China (2000).

[6]    X-L Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao, S. Kimura, Model Calculation of Streaming Potential of Charged Porous Membranes, Third Joint China/USA Chemical Engineering Conference, Beijing, China (2000).

[7]    X-L Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao, S. Kimura, The Transport Mechanism of Nanofiltration Membranes, First Joint China/Japan Chemical Engineering Conference, Beijing, China (2000).

[8]    X-L Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao, S. Kimura, Membrane Potential of Charged Porous Membranes by Space-Charge Model and The Comparison with Teorell-Meyer-Sievers Model, The 1999 International Congress on Membranes and Membrane Processes, Toronto, Canada (1999).

[9]    X. L. Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, The electrostatic and steric - hindrance model for the transport of charged solutes through nanofiltration membranes, J. Membrane Sci., 135, (1997) 19-32.

[10]    X. L. Wang and S. Koda, Scale-up and modeling of oxygen diffusion electrodes for chlorine-alkali electrolysis, I. Analysis of hydrostatic force balance and its effect on electrode performance, Denki Kagaku, 65, (1997) 1002-1013.

[11]    X. L. Wang and S. Koda, Scale-up and modeling of oxygen diffusion electrodes for chlorine-alkali electrolysis, II. Effects of the structural parameters on the electrode performance based on the thin-film and flooded-agglomerate model, Denki Kagaku, 65, (1997) 1014-1025.

[12]    X. L. Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, The electrostatic and steric - hindrance effects on nanofiltration of organic electrolytes, The 1996 International Congress on Membranes and Membrane Processes, Yokohama, Japan (1996); p.194-195 (P-2-1-4).

[13]    X. L. Wang, T. Tsuru, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, Electrolyte transport through nanofiltration membranes by space charge model and the comparison with Teorell - Meyer - Sievers model, J. Membrane Sci., 103, (1995) 117-132.

[14]    X. L. Wang, T. Tsuru, M. Togoh, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, Evaluation of pore structure and electrical properties of nanofiltration membranes, J. Chem. Eng. Japan, 28, (1995) 186-192.

[15] X. L. Wang, T. Tsuru, M. Togoh, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, Transport of organic electrolytes with electrostatic and steric-hindrance effects through nanofiltration membranes, J. Chem. Eng. Japan, 28, (1995) 372-380.

[16] T. Tsuru, X. L. Wang, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, Analysis of electrolyte transport through nanofiltration membranes based on space charge model, 7th International Symposium on Synthetic Membranes in Science and Industry, Tubingen, Germany (1994); p.242-245.

[17] T. Tsuru, X. L. Wang, S. Nakao and S. Kimura, Transport of neutral and charged solutes through nanofiltration membranes, International Symposium on Fiber Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan (1994); p.133 (281C180).